A story about Ron McNair, wonderfully animated

Ron McNair’s brother, Carl, tells the story. The animation is just beautiful.

This comes from an organization called StoryCorps. Thank you, HBCU Digest, for passing this along.

For those of you who aren’t Aggies, Ron McNair was a graduate of A&T. He is remembered here.

Nussbaum entrepreneurship center seeks big ideas: What should they do with this huge old steel mill?

Wide-angle view of the former Carolina Steel plantThe Nussbaum Center for Entrepreneurship is North Carolina’s biggest incubator for start-up businesses. They’ve helped a lot of entrepreneurs get on to good starts.

The center has been given a gigantic gift — the former Carolina Steel plant at 1431 South Elm-Eugene Street, not far from campus.  They’re looking for ideas about what to do with it, and if you have one (or more), they want to hear it. The center will hold three “visionary” meetings:

  • Wednesday April 23, 2:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
  • Wednesday April 23, 5:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
  • Saturday April 26, 9:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

The sessions will be held at the center’s office, 1451 South Elm-Eugene, adjacent to the former mill, now known as the Steelhouse Property. Each session will include a brief tour of the plant and a structured brainstorming session to solicit as many ideas as possible for uses of the property.

Click here to register. And think big. It’s a big place.

(h/t to Action Greensboro for passing this along)

Aggie students are minding their own businesses

Montage of Aggie entrepreneurs' website screenshots

Aggie entrepreneurs on the Internet

Meet Allan, Adey J, Jayrello and Justin — four undergraduates with the talent, drive and ambition to be entrepreneurs. So why wait until graduation? All four have created their own businesses as undergraduates. Anyone who says they don’t have time to live their dreams, talk to these four. You can find them on the Aggie Entrepreneurs page on the A&T website. And if you’re an enrolled A&T student operating your own business, you’re awesome, too. Tell us about it, and we’ll add you to the list.

Visiting Fulbright biochemical engineer to speak: Bio-inspired look at energy and environment issues

What: “A bio-inspired journey through some research challenges of energy and environment,” a lecture by Dr. Ramkrishna Sen, Fulbright Visiting Scholar at Columbia University.

When, where, etc: Tuesday April 15, 2014, 11 a.m. to noon, Fort IRC, Room 410. There is no charge for the workshop.  Fulbright campus representatives and interested faculty are encouraged to attend.  To reserve a seat please email Brendan McKennedy.

Background: Dr. Ramkrishna Sen is an associate professor in the Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, India. He is currently working as Fulbright Visiting Faculty in the Department of Earth & Environmental Engineering, The Fu Foundation School of Engineering & Applied Sciences at Columbia University.

Dr. Sen is a biochemical engineer by training and profession. He has been engaged in R&D in energy and the environment and healthcare. His team has been working on the process development and optimization for antitumor, broad-spectrum antimicrobial and biofilm-disrupting biosurfactants of marine bacterial origin; biosurfactant-enhanced remediation of heavy metals and polyaromatic hydrocarbons; biosurfactant-mediated MEOR and nano-particle synthesis; bioethanol from lignocellulosic biomass; biodiesel from microalgal lipid and non-conventional vegetable oils and algae based CO2 capture & sequestration (CCS) from flue gas coupled with waste water treatment.

The Outreach Lecturing Fund allows Fulbright Visiting Scholars who are currently in the United States to travel to other higher education institutions across the country.  Each year some 800 faculty and professionals from around the world receive Fulbright Scholar grants for advanced research and university lecturing.  The fund allows these scholars to share their specific research interests; speak on the history and culture of their home country; exchange ideas with U.S. students, faculty and community organizations; become better acquainted with U.S. higher education; and create linkages between their home and host institutions and the Council for International Exchange of Scholars.

The metallic biomaterials revolution will be televised and it’s going to be on tonight, actually, on UNC-TV

Screenshot of UNC-TV webpage with video

Watch it tonight on UNC-TV or why not watch it now by clicking the picture to go to the network’s website.

UNC-TV is offering viewers of “North Carolina Now” an inside look at the revolutionary developments being fomented in the Engineering Research Center for Revolutionizing Metallic Biomaterials.  Next-generation implantable medical devices … bioresorbable magnesium alloys … A&T faculty and student researchers … great stuff.

The report will air tonight on the program, which is on at 7:30 on UNC-TV stations across the state.

But those of us who live in the 21st century and are no longer accustomed to waiting around for TV shows to come on can watch it now at the UNC-TV website.  Note: The video works just fine on most browsers (including Android, Chrome, Internet Explorer, and Safari), but your results may vary on Firefox or the Lotus Notes Browser.

 

Clean-energy developer Adewuyi, other faculty honored with 2014 Research Excellence Awards

A nationally recognized pioneer in clean-energy development has been named Senior Researcher of the Year at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University.

Over a career of more than 25 years, Dr. Yusuf “Debo” Adewuyi has skillfully fused chemical engineering and environmental science to explore new dimensions of energy production, including the use of nanoscale materials and sound-wave technology for pollution control.

Dr. Adewuyi is one of five individual researchers and one research team selected this year for N.C. A&T’s highest research honor, the Research Excellence Awards. In addition to Dr. Adewuyi, the honorees are:

  • Dr. Justin Zhan, Department of Computer Science, Outstanding Junior Researcher;
  • Dr. Stephanie Kelly, Department of Business Education, and Dr. Lifeng Zhang, Department of Nanoengineering at the Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering, co-winners of the Rookie of the Year award;
  • Dr. Salil Desai, Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Intellectual Property Award; and
  • The NSF CREST Bioenergy Center, Interdisciplinary Team Award.

They were chosen from a field consisting of faculty members selected as researchers of the year by their colleges and schools. The winners and nominees will be honored Friday April 11 at the annual Celebration of Faculty Excellence.

Details on the winners follow the jump.

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Third annual Innovation Challenge brings out creative, high-tech thinking from undergraduates

Student Michael Baker and tech transfer director Louis Judge

Innovation Challenge winner Michael D. Baker III is congratulated by Louis Judge, N.C. A&T director of technology transfer.

Undergraduates come to college with a lot to learn, but many are already well prepared for one challenge: innovative thinking.

At N.C. A&T this year, the third annual Innovation Challenge produced ideas from 20 teams and individual undergraduates. A total of 43 students participated.

The panel of judges awarded first place to Michael D. Baker III, a junior from Raleigh, for a zero-emission, self-powered vehicle. The concept brings existing technologies together in a novel way to power a vehicle with no internal combustion engine. The first-place prize was an iPad.

Second place went to three sophomores – Mariyah Pressley from Newport News, Virginia; Maya Whitlow, from Germantown, Maryland; and Kendrea Young, from Houston, Texas – for “The SMART Bed,” a twin-, full-, queen-, or king-size bed that would include a variety of built-in systems for personal productivity and relaxation. Each second-place winner received a mini-projector.

Third place was awarded to Kevin Compton, a sophomore from Mebane, N.C., for “The Chameleon,” an electronic system that could render military vehicles virtually invisible. The third-place prize was $75.

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