Tag Archives: North Carolina Research Campus

N.C. A&T post-harvest technologies research center to expand lab space at N.C. Research Campus

Building at N.C. Research Campus in KannapolisThe Center for Excellence in Post-Harvest Technologies has outgrown its lab, so it will lease additional space at the North Carolina Research Campus in Kannapolis. Its staff has grown to 40 researchers and support personnel, and its original 5,800 square foot facility is no longer adequate to provide space for all of its research.

From the Triad Business Journal:

“N.C. A&T State University is expanding its presence at the N.C. Research Campus, the Kannapolis park that’s home to researchers from a multitude of the state’s colleges and universities.

“The park is home to N.C. A&T’s Center for Excellence in Post-Harvest Technologies, which studies ways to process fruits and vegetables after they are harvested. The goal is to find ways to make food safer, extend shelf life and preserve health-promoting nutrients. …

“‘We tie all of this research together and how it impacts our nutrition from every angle, from looking at how a diet rich in phytochemicals impacts our metabolism and our gut microflora, and how it impacts specific genes related to chronic disease,'” said Leonard Williams, director of the N.C. A&T center. “‘Our new lab will allow us to be able to do that research better.'”

N.C. A&T microbiologist gets down to the basics with advice on good grocery shopping habits

Screenshot of Dr. Leonard Williams on "America Now"

Click the picture to see the video of Dr. Leonard Williams on “America Now.”

N.C. A&T microbiologist Dr. Leonard Williams works in one of the most advanced labs at the North Carolina Research Campus in Kannapolis. His work goes deep into the science of pathogens, contamination, and food-borne illness and disease.

Anything you need to know about the molecular, immunological and epidemiological aspects of how food can turn on you, he can tell you. But if all you want to know is what you can do to keep food healthy and safe, he has answers you don’t need a Ph.D. in microbiology to understand.

That’s why the nationally syndicated America Now TV show visited Dr. Williams at A&T’s Center for Excellence in Post-Harvest Technologies. They needed advice for a report on how consumers’ grocery shopping habits can impact the quality and safety of food.

Highlights of Dr. Williams’s advice:

  • Wash that produce!
  • Keep meat or fish from dripping possible contaminants on anything else.
  • Minimize the amount of time raw items sit in your unrefrigerated grocery cart.

Watch those microorganisms! And to see the full report, click the image above.

A&T at the North Carolina Research Campus: Finding new ways to keep healthy food healthy

Dr. Leonard Williams on foodborne illnesses:

“Pathogens cause a lot of deaths, sickness and hospitalization, which results in a tremendous economic burden with loss of work and doctor visits and on the food industry with recalls and lawsuits. It exponentially compounds itself to where it’s (foodborne illness) probably one of the most costly to treat. It is something we hope to help find a remedy for through the research in this center.”

From a video interview and news report at the website of the North Carolina Research Campus in Kannapolis, home of the N.C. A&T Center for Excellence in Post-Harvest Technologies.

A&T, NCCU team up to study disease-fighting ginger

Screengrab of Dr. Sang interviewed by UNC-TV

Dr. Shengmin Sang of the Center for Excellence in Post-Harvest Technologies, N.C. A&T’s research center at the North Carolina Research Campus in Kannapolis

The bioactive compounds in ginger pack a punch, two of them, actually. Fresh ginger contains anemia-fighting gingerols. Dry ginger contains shogaols, biocompounds that could be helpful in preventing cancer. Scientists from N.C., A&T and N.C. Central University are working together to determine how the human body can get the most benefit from those compounds.

UNC-TV will air a report on the research tonight (December 18), on “North Carolina Now” at 7:30 p.m. But if you want to watch it now or any time, just click here.