Tag Archives: nanoengineering

Two faculty leaders among 40 Leaders Under 40

Two outstanding faculty members holding their plaques

Dr. Kelly Graves and Dr. Salil Desai

An industrial engineer working at the nano level and a clinical psychologist working at the community level represent N.C. A&T in the Triad Business Journal’s 2015 class of 40 Leaders Under 40 for the Piedmont Triad area.

The selection of faculty members Dr. Salil Desai and Dr. Kelly Graves was announced this week.  The program sponsored by the weekly business newspaper has now honored six A&T faculty and staff members in the past five years.

Dr. Salil Desai

Desai is an associate professor in the Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering. He was honored for his research in collaboration with high-tech nano and bio companies that has the potential to revolutionize the fabrication of regenerative tissue scaffolds, bio-chem sensors and functionally gradient materials that lead to next-generation devices and systems.

Desai patented a major advance in nanomanufacturing, a process that can fabricate selective features at both the micro- and nano-scale. The ability to fabricate structures from the micro-scale to the nano-scale with varied geometry and high precision in a wide variety of materials is important in advancing the practical impact of micro- and nano-technology in the semiconductor, biotechnology and industrial sectors.

He has collaborated with NanoTechLabs of Yadkinville to apply his technology to the fabrication of flexible Thin-Film-Transistors for aerospace technologies. Their team has received Small Business Technology Transfer funding from the U.S. Air Force. The innovation was supported by the Oak Ridge National Lab as a disruptive technology.

Desai was awarded the National Science Foundation CAREER award to investigate fundamental phenomena for developing innovative nano/micro scale processes ($400,000, 2009). The CAREER Program “offers the National Science Foundation’s most prestigious awards in support of junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research…”

He also serves as an affiliated faculty member of the bioengineering program, an affiliated faculty member of the Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering, an adjunct faculty member at the Wake Forest University Institute for Regenerative Medicine, and co-leader of research in cardiovascular devices for the NSF Engineering Research Center for Revolutionizing Metallic Biomaterials at A&T. Desai is director of A&T’s Integrated Nano & Bio Manufacturing Laboratory, a clean room in which his students conduct fundamental research toward developing novel nano/bio manufacturing processes for a variety of applications. He is an active researcher and educator in the interdisciplinary fields of nano/micro and bio manufacturing.

Dr. Kelly Graves

Graves is executive director of N.C. A&T’s Center for Behavioral Health and Wellness, an interdisciplinary group of professionals in counselling, criminology, health education, peer support, psychiatry, psychology, public health, social work, substance abuse counselling, and wellness coaching. They provide community-focused, evidence-based, and culturally competent behavioral health services.

Graves created the Center to bring the community a new level of trauma-focused services. Since it was established in 2012, she has grown the center’s staff from four to more than 20 and secured over $2.5 million in funding. She has led the development of partnerships with 42 public and private organizations – including the Greensboro Police; Guilford County Schools; Guilford departments of public health and social services, and other state and local public agencies; and 20 private agencies such as Family Service of the Piedmont, Guilford Child Development, and the Women’s Resource Center.

The center serves Greensboro and Guilford County by providing mental health and substance abuse services with a particular specialty in trauma recovery. Its current projects include:

  • The Greensboro Child Response Initiative, a partnership with the Greensboro Police Department to provide advocacy services and resource linkages to children and families experiencing violence or trauma.
  • Guilford County Child Trauma Task Force, a project co-led by the center and the Department of Social Services to create a systemic approach to prevention, education, and awareness about child trauma.
  • Project I-CARE, a collaboration with Triad Adult and Pediatric Medicine to offer co-located, integrated physical and behavioral health services for uninsured patients. Services are also available in Spanish.

Graves is a tenured faculty member in the Department of Human Development and Services in the School of Education. She teaches at the masters and doctoral level. She also trains professionals across the country on the implementation of evidence-based practices in behavioral health settings.

Graves conducts research on the integration of behavioral and physical health, integration of co-occurring disorders into treatment, trauma, poly-victimization and other topics. She shares her expertise nationally as a consultant with the U.S. Department of Justice, the Bureau of Justice Assistance, and through her books and articles.

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JSNN launches program with university in India

The Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering

The Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering, with the atrium lit up for event being held there Tuesday evening.

The Joint School of Nanoscience  and Nanoengineering has launched a program with Bharati Vidyapeeth Deemed University (BVDU) that will bring master’s students from India to the joint school.

“Their students complete the coursework for their M.Tech degree at BVDU, and a small number will come to JSNN to perform their research for their degree,” said Dr. Jim Ryan, JSNN dean.

“The program is very competitive, and the students who will come to JSNN are of the highest caliber. We expect four to arrive in January.”

Some of the students may have an opportunity to stay at the JSNN for their doctoral degrees, Ryan said.

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N.C. A&T grant of the month: Monitoring strucutral integrity of armor, weapons

U.S. Army logoThe Sponsored Funding Report for June:

N.C. A&T received 23 grants totaling $17.19 million in June.

The complete list of grants received in June.

One highlight was a grant worth $616,956 from the Army Research Office to Dr. Mannur Sundaresan of the Department of Mechanical Engineering.  Dr. Albert Esterline of the Department of Computer Science also will work on the project.

The project: Prognostic Health Management of DoD Assets

The issue: Acoustic emission-based structural health monitoring techniques have great potential for determining the current state of health of critical structures, such as Army vehicles and weapons systems, and predicting their future performance.  However, current technology relies mostly on empirical approaches for interpreting AE signals, a technique that has been plagued by ambiguity and false positives.

With a better understanding of the physics of acoustic emission (AE) signal propagation and the development of signal processing techniques, AE-based techniques can play a larger role in developing highly efficient, adaptive, and survivable vehicles, armor, and machinery and the assurance of their safety and integrity.

Abstract:  This research will develop numerical models, experiments, algorithms, web architectures, and other tools applicable to prognostic health management. The research will address identification of critical damage states in composite structural elements and strategies for sensing such states with multiple sensors.

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JSNN reaches milestone on state funding

Congratulations to the Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering. For the first time, its full state funding request has been included as a recurring item in the budget, The Business Journal reports today (subscription required).

“The final legislative budget converted the $1 million of nonrecurring funds that had previously been passed for the school into $2 million in recurring funds. … The JSNN, which is run in partnership by UNC-Greensboro and N.C. A&T State University, has been receiving $4.9 million in recurring funds from the state, but school officials had to return to the legislature each year for enough nonrecurring funding to fill a budget gap.”

Nothing is absolutely certain until Gov. Bev Perdue signs off on the budget as whole.  She still has some problems with it, but the JSNN funding isn’t reported to be one of them.

Still, the General Assembly has acted, and that’s a big milestone.  The legislators have given the school strong, bipartisan support for several years. That’s something you don’t see every day in Raleigh.

The next time you have a chance, thank a legislator.  In an economy that remains in desperately bad shape, they’ve made a tough decision and done the right thing for us, for our community and our state.

JSNN to host nanomanufacturing conference

The science and technology of nanomanufacturing will be the subjects of a conference this summer at the Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering.

The one-day Nanomanufacturing Conference will be held Wednesday August 15. The conference website contains program and registration information.

Sessions will focus on nanomanufacturing for such applications as aerospace, energy, and  biotechnology.

The keynote speakers will be Dr. Altaf Carim, assistant director for nanotechnology, Office of Science and Technology Policy, Executive Office of the President; and Dr. Jeffrey Morse, managing director of the National Nanomanufacturing Network.

The conference is organized by the JSNN; COIN, the Center of Innovation for Nanobiotechnology; the Nanobusiness Commercialization Association; and the North Carolina Aerospace Alliance.

N.C. A&T grant of the month for April and May: $131,000 for cell-based toxicity assay-on-chip

The Sponsored Funding Report for April and May:

N.C. A&T received 26 grants totaling $2.61 million in April and May.

The complete list of grants received in April and May.

Logo for Semiconductor Research Corp.One highlight of the funding was a grant worth $131,000 from the Semiconductor Research Corp. to Dr. Shyam Aravamudhan of the Department of Nanoenigneering at the Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering.  Dr. Aravamudhan is an A&T faculty member.

The project: Cell-based toxicity assay-on-chip for the next-generation CMOS technology

The issue: It is recognized that the unique quantum properties of engineered nanomaterials (ENs) strongly influence their physico-chemical properties, resulting in novel electrical, optical, thermal and magnetic properties not present in their corresponding bulk counterparts. For example, nanostructures’ huge surface area to volume ratio make them not only more reactive and but uniquely applicable for next-generation devices, including for implantable CMOS. This large surface area is just one of the many factors that alter nanostructures’ biological interfaces. Other aspects include their size, shape, surface functionality, charge, composition (organic, inorganic or hybrid), aggregation, solubility. Because of the widely tunable sizes and compositions, ENs can dynamically modify under different biological and environmental conditions, thus limiting options for uniform nano-bio interactions and standardization.

Abstract:  The objective of this project is to establish a robust, rapid throughput and high-content screening platform to study biological interactions of ENs implemented on a beyond-CMOS substrate, including their potential toxicities due to their unique physico-chemical properties at the nano-scale. Towards this objective, we propose a multi-faceted exercise beyond the traditional singular-focus efforts involving a multi-disciplinary group of researchers from nanoengineering, nano-biophysics, nanochemistry and toxicology. An over-arching goal is to develop a new approach of scientific integration where nano-ESH is an integral part of EN design rather than a post facto add-on.