Tag Archives: NC TraCS

Health science researchers: Apply by November 17 for opportunity to receive release time next spring

Writing a quality proposal requires time, energy and thought, three commodities in short supply when you’re teaching a full class load. If you’re an A&T faculty researcher in health science who would benefit from release from one class to prepare a competitive proposal, we have an opportunity for you. And it’s an opportunity with a short turn-around time.

Applications are being taken through Monday November 17 for faculty release time from one class during the Spring 2015 semester to develop a proposal in the health science area in response to a solicitation from an external sponsor. The number of faculty members receiving funding will be limited only by the quality of proposals submitted by the November 17 deadline.

Apply only if you will work on a proposal due in late summer 2015 or early fall 2015. Spring 2015 deadlines are too close for faculty to benefit from this opportunity.

A question-and-answer session will be held on Wednesday November 5, 5:30 p.m., in the Fort IRC, Room 410.

Full details are here.

This is an especially good opportunity to collaborate with researchers at UNC Chapel Hill and RTI International, A&T’s partners in the North Carolina Translational and Clinical Sciences Institute (NC TraCS).  A&T faculty members are encouraged, but not required, to consider how their research interests may coincide with the priorities of NC TraCS.

Welcome back! Here’s a summer news recap: Hypoallergenic peanuts, EPICS, NC TraCS & more

To all who were gone over the summer, welcome back. Here’s a rundown of the top research-related news at A&T since May:

Faculty members, department chairs, and deans: We want to write about your research, scholarly and creative activity!  Let us know about it; click here for email.

A&T researcher’s work on COPD among ag workers wins support from NC TraCS program for scholars

Dr. Jenora Waterman has made one key discovery toward improving the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) among agricultural workers, and now she’s been accepted into a prestigious career development program to advance her research.

Headshot of Dr. Waterman

Dr. Jenora Waterman

Dr. Waterman is an assistant professor of functional genomics in the Department of Animal Sciences at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University. COPD is a major cause of death in the United States, most typically found among smokers. A less studied aspect of the disease is the 7% of its U.S. victims who are agricultural workers. They can develop COPD as a result of long-term exposure to animal production facilities containing dust that contributes to respiratory diseases.

High-density swine production houses are one example of such facilities.

Dr. Waterman’s first key finding came from comparing pigs raised indoors with those raised outdoors. Pigs aren’t as severely affected by the dust as humans are, but her work demonstrated that their respiratory systems are uniquely adapted to their housing type.

“My lab recently showed for the first time that pigs reared indoors and those raised outdoors exhibit structural and cellular differences in their respiratory systems,” Dr. Waterman says.

“The next step will be studying those differences to identify potential biomarkers that could serve as diagnostic or prognostic markers of agriculture-related COPD in humans.”

Dr. Waterman will take that step as an NC TraCS K-Scholar, a professional development honor for junior faculty members funded through the Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) program of the National Institutes of Health.

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