Tag Archives: bioengineering

Sen. Hagan tours Engineering Research Center, promotes her bill to support innovation at HBCUs

Sen. Hagan speaking to reporters

Sen. Kay Hagan speaks to reporters at the Fort IRC.

Sen. Hagan and news media photographers in research lab

Sen. Hagan listens to Wayne Szafranski of A&T in the Engineering Research Center’s  Material Processing and Characterization Lab.

U.S. Sen. Kay Hagan is promoting innovation at historically black universities, and on Monday she brought the news media to N.C. A&T for a close-up look at what she’s talking about.

Accompanied by a group of national and local reporters and, photographers, and videographers, Sen. Hagan toured the NSF Engineering Research Center for Revolutionizing Metallic Biomaterials and then held a news conference to talk about her bill to create a Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) Innovation Fund.

The Engineering Research Center is developing an advanced magnesium alloy to make screws, plates, and other implantable devices that could hold broken or surgically repaired bones in place for healing and then dissolve and pass out of the body when they’re no longer needed.

The technology could eliminate the need in many cases for either surgical removal or for patients to carry metal parts in their bones for a lifetime.

Sen. Hagan was joined in her news conference by Chancellor Harold L. Martin Sr. and two A&T bioengineering grad students, Adrienne Daley and Roman Blount.

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Weekly Biology seminar: Nanobioelectronics

This week’s Department of Biology weekly seminar,  Wednesday January 29, noon, Barnes Hall, Room 221:

Topic: Nanobioelectronics: Convergence of Microsystems, Nanotechnology and Bioengineering

Speaker: Dr. Shyam Aravamudhan, Assistant  Professor, Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering

Abstract: Nanobioelectronics is an emerging field at the intersection of semiconductor nano/microfabrication, biology, and electronics, with the goal of novel devices for disease diagnostics, regenerative medicine, and even for advanced computing. In this talk, Dr. Aravamudhan will present the current work being done in the lab in this emerging field with a particular emphasis on (a) multi-modal diagnostic device-on-chip, (b) microsystem-based regenerative tissue engineering and (c) methods to understand toxicity of engineering nanomaterials.

Seminar: Thinking Beyond Medical Help: Psychological Implications Surrounding Physical Trauma

Dr. Robin Liles

Liles

This week’s Engineering Research Center-Bioengineering Joint Seminar, Friday January 24, 11 a.m., McNair Hall, Auditorium:

Topic: Thinking Beyond Medical Help: Psychological Implications Surrounding Physical Trauma

Speaker: Dr. Robin Guill Liles, Associate Professor, Department of Human Development and Services, N.C. A&T, and Associate Director for Assessment, NSF Engineering Research Center for Revolutionizing Metallic Biomaterials. Dr. Liles is a Licensed Professional Counselor and National Certified Counselor.

Abstract: A primary and aspirational goal for bioengineering is to develop life-sustaining, even life-saving devices.  This goal has significant implications for individuals living with physical impairment and disability.  However, medical science and its many supportive “arms” (e.g., bioengineering) can fall short in considering the psychological implications surrounding physical trauma.

Addressing certain mental health issues and concerns may exceed the professional purview of medical providers and their bioengineering counterparts. Nonetheless, possessing an enhanced understanding of trauma-related psychology could positively impact both medical care and related scientific and engineering conceptualizations and experimentation.

This seminar delivers an overview of post-traumatic stress disorder, a mental health disorder often associated with severe and sudden onset of physical injury, disease, and other life-threatening events.

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Engineering Distinguished Speaker Series presents bioengineering innovator/entrepreneur Mir Imran

Flyer for talk by Mir Imran

3 diverse new research projects at N.C. A&T explore blood-brain barrier, risk management, wheat bran

Three new research projects at N.C. A&T aim to explore the weakening of the blood-brain barrier in  Alzheimer’s disease patients, to apply risk management to supply chain logistics, and to find a way to make dietary fiber taste better.

The projects are the first ones funded at A&T for each of the three principal investigators. All were funded in October.  They were among 29 new or continuing projects receiving external funding during the month, totaling more than $10 million.

The complete list of projects receiving external sponsored funding in October

The projects are (click the links for one-page summaries):

  • “Brain pericyte and amyloid-beta peptide interaction,” Dr. Donghui Zhu, Department of Bioengineering, $142,000, National Institutes of Health. One hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease is a compromised blood-brain barrier  characterized by significant reductions in critically important pericyte cells on the exterior walls of endothelia.  Our long-term goal is to determine the role of brain pericytes in the development of Alzheiner’s disease and to develop drugs to preserve pericytes functioning in Alzheimer’s patients.
  • “Understanding Risks and Disruptions in Supply Chains and their Effect on Firm and Supply Chain Performance,” Dr. Mahour Mellat-Parast, Department of Applied Engineering Technology, $200,000, National Science Foundation. This project provides the first comprehensive view of managing risks and disruptions within supply chains in different industries with respect to the stage and scope of the risk. As such, it facilitates the formation and establishment of an integrative discipline (risk engineering/risk management) utilizing engineering, technology, and management foundations.
  • “Modification of Wheat and Corn Brans by Microfluidization Process,” Dr. Guibing Chen, Center for Excellence in Post-Harvest Technologies, N.C. Research Campus, $299,000, USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture. Numerous studies indicate that dietary fiber plays a protective role against obesity, but it’s difficult for anyone eating a typical Western diet to consumer adequate fiber.  Research is needed to improve sensory properties of high-fiber foods and to enhance the fiber ingredients’ nutritional value. We propose to modify physicochemical and nutritional properties of wheat and corn brans using a microfluidization process. This technique will significantly improve palatability and nutritional value.

5 major new research projects at N.C. A&T

An array of new research, education and community engagement projects at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical University will result in new services for young victims of trauma, research on preventing colon cancer, and a new joint program in astronomy to be conducted with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  New programs in social computing and bioengineering are also under way.

Five  of the top new research projects funded recently at North Carolina A&T:

The complete list of projects receiving external sponsored funding in September