Seminar: Medical radioisotopes via reversible gels

Headshot of Dr. Bridges

Dr. Novella Bridges

The Chemistry Department invites you to attend a seminar Thursday, October 9, 11 a.m. in the New Science Building, Room 200. The guest speaker is Dr. Novella Bridges of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Abstract

“Radiogels: Reversible Gels for Delivery of Medical Radioisotopes: Using our RadioGel™ technology, it will be possible to successfully deliver a self-contained high-dose of radiation into a cancerous tumor. This technology will enable the maximum dose of radiation to be absorbed and allow a concise and uniform delivery into the targeted cancer tissue. This delivery system will minimize the radiation dose to the patient and other closely associated healthy tissue that might garner side effects.

“A vital component of the radiogel is a new polymer-based material. This material is biodegradable, water-based and thermally reversible stimulus-sensitive gelling copolymer. This copolymer is combined (in solution) with a high-energy, beta-particle-emitting radioisotope (Yttrium-90) in the form of a colloid. It is the colloid that is trapped within the solidified matrix of the gel that produces the high-dose of radiation.

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Faculty members: New to writing grant proposals? Apply now for the ‘Get Funded’ seminar series

The Division of Research and Economic Development and Bluford Library are offering an intensive proposal development series for faculty members with little or no grant-writing experience.

“Get Funded” will walk you through the full grant-writing process. The program will include 18 sessions of 90 minutes each. The sessions will build on knowledge gained from previous sessions. The series will begin later this semester.

Participating faculty will:

  • Prepare and submit a grant proposal to a sponsor,
  • Develop effective grantsmanship skills, and
  • Learn to use proposal development resources.

Application deadline is Monday, October 13. Signatures of your department chair and your school’s associate/assistant dean for research are required, so plan your time accordingly.  Click here for the application.

For more information, contact Nina Exner.

Research commercialization webinar course begins Tuesday, produced by NIH and free to researchers

What: Research Commercialization Introductory Course

When: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., October 7 to November 20. Lecture 1: The Importance of Commercializing Research, Tuesday, October 7, 2014, 1:00 to 2:30 pm ET

Registration: The course is free.  Click this link to register for all sessions: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/158991634 (or copy and paste this URL to your browser: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/158991634).

Once registered, you will receive an email reminder 24 hours before each session.

About the course:

Each lecture is a live 90-minute online class with Q&A.

Now on its seventh run, the Research Commercialization Introductory Course is a popular online course designed to help science and engineering researchers better understand how research commercialization works. Over 5,000 students, faculty and researchers have taken this course since it’s been offered.

Research commercialization involves taking articles, documentation, know-how, patents, and copyrights, which are created during research activities and getting them to users and patients for real societal impacts. In some cases, commercialization involved taking patents based on the research and licensing them to a company. This usually involves also having the researchers consult to the company. In other cases, commercialization involves forming of creating a startup and applying to federally funded commercialization programs. In all cases, though, research commercialization typically involves defining the nature of the research being commercialized (e.g., in a patent or intellectual property agreement), establishing a commercial relationship with another party (e.g., employment, a sale or license), and negotiating a contract (e.g., compensation).

Areas covered in the course include intellectual property, patents, copyrights, trade secrets, trademarks, licensing agreements, employment agreements, consulting agreements, tech transfer, creating and funding companies, and federally funded Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) programs

Who should take this course?

The Research Commercialization Course is recommended for all science, engineering and medical researchers in public or private research institutions (e.g., grad students, post-docs, and faculty). This is an indispensable course for S&E grad students looking for jobs in the next 6-18 months.

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N.C. A&T, Xemerge launch spin-off peanut company; 1st hypoallergenic peanuts ready for food industry

Group shot of A&T and Alrgn executives

The team bringing safer peanuts to the world (from left): Wayne Szafranski, A&T director of economic outreach; Barry Burks, vice chancellor for research; Louis Judge, director of technology transfer; Jianmei Yu, research scientist; Johnny Rodrigues, Alrgn Bio founder; and Ann Russell, Alrgn director of U.S. operations.

The world’s first commercially available hypoallergenic peanuts have officially emerged from the laboratory.

Alrgn Bio, exclusive licensee of the hypoallergenic process patented by North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, has opened an office in the Gateway University Research Park.  Batches of peanuts are available to the food industry for evaluation, Alrgn announced today.

“We have received tremendous interest since we announced in June that the technology is available,” said Johnny Rodrigues, Alrgn founder.

“We will work with food processors and manufacturers to establish this process as the industry standard for peanuts and peanut-derived ingredients. We’ll work together to deliver safer peanut products to consumers as quickly as possible.”

Alrgn made the announcement Thursday at its demonstration facility at the Gateway University Research Park in Greensboro, North Carolina. Alrgn is a spin-off of N.C. A&T and Xemerge, the North Carolina- and Toronto-based technology development company that originally licensed the A&T peanut technology.

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NSF official here Monday to speak to researchers

NSF official Sylvia James

NSF official Sylvia James

Dr. Sylvia James, Director for the National Science Foundation’s Human Resource Development Division (HRD), will speak at an open forum on Monday, October 6, 10-11:30 a.m. in the General Classroom Building, Room 218.

Dr. James will focus on HRD’s strategies on broadening the participation of underrepresented students through institutional transformations within higher education.

As chief administrator, she has oversight over HRD, which is in the Directorate of Education and Human Resource (EHR). She manages the LS-AMP, HBCU-UP, CREST, AGEP, and ADVANCE programs, among others. EHR’s mission is to achieve excellence in U.S. science, technology, engineering and mathematics education at all levels.

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Undergrad research opportunity: drone technology

Flyer for Perseu III program

Ph.D. students: Chapel Hill’s postdoctoral program for faculty diversity taking applications for 2015

WHAT: The 2015 Carolina Postdoctoral Program for Faculty Diversity

DETAILS: Scholars for the Carolina Postdoctoral Program for Faculty Diversity are selected each year and are provided support for two years. The current stipend is $42,000.

The program is intended to attract postdoctoral fellows from underrepresented racial/ethnic groups to UNC-Chapel Hill to prepare them for tenure-track faculty positions at UNC-CH and other research universities.

KEY DATES: Application deadline is Saturday, November 15, 2014. Final decisions will be made in February 2015. The next class of the Carolina Postdoctoral Program for Faculty Diversity will begin July 1, 2015.

FURTHER INFORMATION: Contact Jennifer Pruitt, program coordinator, Office of Postdoctoral Affairs, click for email, or visit the program web page or the Office of Postdoctoral Affairs.