Category Archives: News Media

Two next-generation N.C. A&T stars honored

Mr. Judge and Dr. Graham, two outstanding young professionals

Louis Judge III (left) and Anthony Graham, N.C. A&T’s two winners of the 2014 40 Leaders Under 40 Award

An advocate for young black men and an advocate for entrepreneurs are two young professionals at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University who have been recognized among the 2014 “40 Leaders Under 40” in the Piedmont Triad by The Business Journal.

Dr. Anthony Graham, chairman of the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, and Mr. Louis Judge III, the university’s director of technology transfer, received their awards February 20.

Details on both follow the jump.

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Research integrity and ‘The Art of War’

Cover of an edition of The Art of WarIf anyone needs a reminder of the damage that can be caused when research integrity is called into question — rightly or wrongly — take a look at the news coverage of N.C. State and UNC-Chapel Hill lately.

It’s hard to argue against the idea that any time the news media’s attention is drawn to research integrity questions, everyone involved loses.  Accusations tend to stick in the public consciousness regardless of the outcome, especially in complex, drawn-out situations. Even when the process of correcting scientific errors plays out as it should — as may well be case now at State — it is at best a slow, painstaking process that doesn’t lend itself well to the appetite of  the news media and the public for quick, clear resolutions.

The Art of War offers a lesson that applies especially to well to these situations: The highest virtue is not to win a battle, but rather to win without a battle. Avoiding a fight — in this case by conducting research in an unquestionably rigorous way and taking any questions about the results seriously rather than defensively– is even better than winning.  That doesn’t mean you can necessarily avoid being dragged into the mud by someone with an agenda, but it’s your best defense.

The researchers in the N.C. State case had a chance to avoid going to war over their results but chose a stonewalling strategy that invited trouble even if they’re right. In Chapel Hill … what a mess. The researcher herself may or may not have produced valid results, but when she went to CNN, her own administration chose to go to the mattresses, questioning results they found problematic in a way that, so far, at least, has generated more heat than light.

Details and links follow the jump.

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WUNC-TV news report on STEM at N.C. A&T

WUNC-TV screenshot“To understand the depth of commitment that N.C. A&T has for science, technology, engineering, & math, you have to go back more than 150-years to when President Lincoln created land grant universities throughout the union. N.C. A&T is part of that legacy. Founded in 1890, A&T emphasized agriculture & mechanical arts. Today, they call it STEM, & its presence is apparent in every corner of the campus.”

Click here to see the report from “North Carolina Now.”

A&T, NCCU team up to study disease-fighting ginger

Screengrab of Dr. Sang interviewed by UNC-TV

Dr. Shengmin Sang of the Center for Excellence in Post-Harvest Technologies, N.C. A&T’s research center at the North Carolina Research Campus in Kannapolis

The bioactive compounds in ginger pack a punch, two of them, actually. Fresh ginger contains anemia-fighting gingerols. Dry ginger contains shogaols, biocompounds that could be helpful in preventing cancer. Scientists from N.C., A&T and N.C. Central University are working together to determine how the human body can get the most benefit from those compounds.

UNC-TV will air a report on the research tonight (December 18), on “North Carolina Now” at 7:30 p.m. But if you want to watch it now or any time, just click here.

 

Martin, Sankar among Triad’s ‘Most Influential’

Cover of The Business Journal's "Most Influential People" sectionChancellor Harold L. Martin, Sr., and Dr. Jagannathan Sankar are among the Piedmont Triad leaders named to the “Most Influential People” list by The Business Journal of the Triad.

Martin was cited for his “ambitious agenda” to increase the university’s enrollment, research and engagement. Sankar earned his place on the list by virtue of the technology commercialization work recently initiated by the NSF Engineering Research Center for Revolutionizing Metallic Biomaterials, of which he is director.

Other persons of interest on the list:

  • Dr. David Carroll, Director of the Center for Nanotechnology and Molecular Materials, Wake Forest University;
  • George Clopton, Vice President of Supply Chain Operations, Ralph Lauren Corp.,  High Point, and board chairman, International Civil Rights Center and Museum;
  • “Elder statesman” Henry Frye, now of counsel with the law firm Brooks Pierce McLendon Humphrey & Leonard;
  • Shirley Frye, chair of the Joseph M. Bryan Foundation, vice chair of the N.C. A&T Foundation, and board member for the N.C. School of Math and Science and High Point University, among many others; and
  • Dean Jim Ryan of the Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering.

 

A&T faculty, grad student help create a ‘city oasis’

The leaders N.C. A&T's contribution to the urban farm in the Warnersville community of Greensboro

Dr. Guochen Yang, left, graduate student Michael King, and Odile Huchette, director of Reid Greenhouse at A&T, at Prince of Peace Lutheran Church in the Warnersville community of Greensboro (News & Record photo)

The Greensboro-High Point area was ranked second in a 2012 national report on food insecurity.  The county Health Department started looking for solutions and was joined by a church, a nonprofit, and a UNCG professor. When N.C. A&T joined the project, everything was in place to address at least one of Greensboro’s “food deserts.”

A&T had just created the first undergraduate program in the nation for urban and community horticulture, as well as a master’s degree program emphasizing sustainable agriculture. The administration was also encouraging more community involvement for faculty members and students.

“We want to produce quality students who can go and get started right away on practical projects,” [Dr. Guochen] Yang said. “We want them to be ready to solve real-world problems.”

The News & Record has excellent coverage of the project.

 

N.C. A&T researchers generating headlines

This week’s two major announcements are producing positive news coverage for research at N.C. A&T.

News 14 Carolina covered  the announcement of the Engineering Research Center collaborating with InCube Labs to commercialize its metallic biomaterials technology.

Screen capture of TV news report

Click on the photo to go to the News 14 Carolina report

The Business Journal was all over that story as well.

“Scientists at N.C. A&T and ERC partners such as the University of Pittsburgh and University of Cincinnati are developing new materials, primarily magnesium alloys, designed to adapt to the human body and grow after implantation without having to be refitted, and then later safely absorbed into the bloodstream without ill effects. That could change the way that children born with birth defects, injured soldiers and others with major bone damage are treated.

“There are myriad possible uses for such materials, and the job of InCube Labs will be to identify which have the best potential to be translated into practical products quickly. InCube was founded by Mir Imran, a venture capitalist and entrepreneur who has founded more than 20 life-science companies and holds more than 200 patents.”

And the editorial page of The News & Observer in Raleigh published an editorial, “Huge grant spotlights how universities benefit state’s economy,” about the $54.6 million clinical and translational science project to be conducted by UNC-CH, A&T, and RTI International, and a similar award to Duke. They hope the awards send a message to North Carolina’s governor:

“Let’s hope those Republican legislators and Gov. Pat McCrory, who have made an issue of how universities should focus on training people for jobs instead of educating them in, say, arts and literature, take note of what’s going on here. Universities do train people for the workforce, but they’re also about ideas, about opening minds, about exploring new horizons.”