Category Archives: JSNN

Clean-energy developer Adewuyi, other faculty honored with 2014 Research Excellence Awards

A nationally recognized pioneer in clean-energy development has been named Senior Researcher of the Year at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University.

Over a career of more than 25 years, Dr. Yusuf “Debo” Adewuyi has skillfully fused chemical engineering and environmental science to explore new dimensions of energy production, including the use of nanoscale materials and sound-wave technology for pollution control.

Dr. Adewuyi is one of five individual researchers and one research team selected this year for N.C. A&T’s highest research honor, the Research Excellence Awards. In addition to Dr. Adewuyi, the honorees are:

  • Dr. Justin Zhan, Department of Computer Science, Outstanding Junior Researcher;
  • Dr. Stephanie Kelly, Department of Business Education, and Dr. Lifeng Zhang, Department of Nanoengineering at the Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering, co-winners of the Rookie of the Year award;
  • Dr. Salil Desai, Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Intellectual Property Award; and
  • The NSF CREST Bioenergy Center, Interdisciplinary Team Award.

They were chosen from a field consisting of faculty members selected as researchers of the year by their colleges and schools. The winners and nominees will be honored Friday April 11 at the annual Celebration of Faculty Excellence.

Details on the winners follow the jump.

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Electrospun Meta-aramid Mats and Their Application

This week’s Engineering Research Center-Bioengineering Joint Seminar, Friday February 7, 11 a.m., McNair Hall, Auditorium:

Topic: Electrospun Meta-aramid Mats and Their Application

headshot of Dr. Kim

Dr. Hak Yong Kim

Speaker: Dr. Hak Yong Kim, Professor of Bio-Info-Nano Fusion Technology and Professor of Organic Materials and Fiber, Chonbuk National University, Jeonbuk, Korea.  Dr. Kim’s areas of research include biomaterials, polymeric composites and functional materials. He has 245 refereed journal publications with a total of over 5,200 citations. He holds 6 U.S. patents and 80 Korean patents.

Abstract: The effect of salt formation during condensation polymerization on the  morphology of electrospun meta-aramid fibers was investigated. The presence of a by-product salt (calcium chloride, CaCl2) improved the electrospinnability of the meta-aramid solution and induced the formation of a spider-web-like structure in the mats.

The effect of the concentration of the solution and applied voltage on the formation of the spider-web-like fibrous structure was investigated. FE-SEM images indicated that the very thin fibers were uniformly distributed with thick fibers throughout the mats in the form of a spider-web-like structure. TGA showed that the thermal stability of the electrospun meta-aramid mats was affected by CaCl2.

The observed enhancement in the thermal and mechanical properties of the mats, which was attributed to the formation of the spider-web-like structure, may increase the number of potential applications of meta-aramid, such as second battery separator, water/air filtration, protective clothing and electrical insulation.

Martin, Sankar among Triad’s ‘Most Influential’

Cover of The Business Journal's "Most Influential People" sectionChancellor Harold L. Martin, Sr., and Dr. Jagannathan Sankar are among the Piedmont Triad leaders named to the “Most Influential People” list by The Business Journal of the Triad.

Martin was cited for his “ambitious agenda” to increase the university’s enrollment, research and engagement. Sankar earned his place on the list by virtue of the technology commercialization work recently initiated by the NSF Engineering Research Center for Revolutionizing Metallic Biomaterials, of which he is director.

Other persons of interest on the list:

  • Dr. David Carroll, Director of the Center for Nanotechnology and Molecular Materials, Wake Forest University;
  • George Clopton, Vice President of Supply Chain Operations, Ralph Lauren Corp.,  High Point, and board chairman, International Civil Rights Center and Museum;
  • “Elder statesman” Henry Frye, now of counsel with the law firm Brooks Pierce McLendon Humphrey & Leonard;
  • Shirley Frye, chair of the Joseph M. Bryan Foundation, vice chair of the N.C. A&T Foundation, and board member for the N.C. School of Math and Science and High Point University, among many others; and
  • Dean Jim Ryan of the Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering.

 

‘NanoBio Launchpad’ at Gateway research park

Gateway University Research Park mapThe Gateway University Research Park has created space for use as a business incubator for nanobio start-ups. The “NanoBio Launchpad” is located at the park’s south campus in the building next door to the Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering (JSNN).

The 2,500 square foot space contains three offices, eight workstations and a shared laboratory.

From The Business Journal:

“Ideally, Launchpad occupants will be able to benefit from the close proximity to the JSNN and the new Nanomanufacturing Innovation Consortium, through which private-sector nano organizations gain access to the expensive equipment and brainpower at the school. In the best case scenario for Gateway, companies that get started in the Launchpad will grow into traditional space in the research park’s current and future buildings.”

The full Business Journal article is here.

The Launchpad is in the Research Facility One building. The building also contains the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resource Conservation Service and East National Technical Support Center; Advaero Technologies, a N.C. A&T nanotech spin-off company; and Gateway’s administrative offices.

The Gateway research park and JSNN both are operated jointly by N.C. A&T and UNC Greensboro.

Reminder: Biofuels event at JSNN on Dec. 13

More progress on biofuels: A&T, JSNN to host conference on civic and small-scale production

Some government agencies and businesses aren’t waiting for the energy industry to start delivering on the promise of biofuels. Increasingly, in North Carolina and other states, they’re moving ahead on their own.

Their progress will be the subject of the second annual statewide conference on civic and small-scale biofuel projects, to be held next month at the Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering.

The event is organized by the Biofuels Center of North Carolina and is hosted by N.C. A&T and the Joint School.  It will feature talks and case studies on smaller-scale biofuel and biomass production projects operating in North Carolina (including Charlotte, Hickory, and Raleigh), Florida, and Alabama.

Speakers will include officials of state and local government agencies, the private sector, and universities.

The conference will be held Thursday December 13, beginning at 10 a.m. It will conclude with a 3 p.m. tour of biofuel and bioproduct research and development projects at the JSNN.  There is no fee to attend.  Registration information and the full agenda are at the conference website.

The full title of the event is “Civic and Small-scale Biofuels Statewide: A Second Annual Convening of Civic, Production, and Agency Parties.”

Worth noting: Some places aren’t quite ready to move on such opportunities. A local case in point is reported in today’s edition of the News & Record.

Lots of love for JSNN and Kannapolis these days

Flag of Ecuador from http://www.boowakwala.comTwo recent items from the news media  worth noting:

President Rafael Correa of Ecuador visited the North Carolina Research Campus in Kannapolis this week, and he liked what he saw, big time.  From The Charlotte Observer:

Correa is studying the research, scientific instrumentation and collaborative environment of the research campus as a model for the development of Yachay, a planned city of science and technology being built in Ecuador’s northern province of Imbabura.

“Amazing! Outstanding!” said Correa. “A learning experience for us. We are building, in our country, a planned city of knowledge, (and) we want to learn from your experience.”

Trade magazine Advance for Medical Laboratory Professionals dropped in at the Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering recently, and they called it “exciting”:

… JSNN has a number of research projects in emerging areas including nanoenergy technologies, self-assembly methods and computational nanotechnology, Dr. Ryan said. “Each of the research thrusts have great potential, but I believe that JSNN’s research strength is in the highly interdisciplinary areas requiring contributions from both science and engineering to get a ‘game-changing’ result,” he explained.

JSNN has also established a bridge to industry partners by working with the Gateway University Research Park. One such group is the Nanomanufacturing Innovation Consortium. “Consortium members are able to observe research that is underway in the facility, provide input to research programs and have access to the JSNN equipment,” Dr. Ryan explained.

JSNN launches program with university in India

The Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering

The Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering, with the atrium lit up for event being held there Tuesday evening.

The Joint School of Nanoscience  and Nanoengineering has launched a program with Bharati Vidyapeeth Deemed University (BVDU) that will bring master’s students from India to the joint school.

“Their students complete the coursework for their M.Tech degree at BVDU, and a small number will come to JSNN to perform their research for their degree,” said Dr. Jim Ryan, JSNN dean.

“The program is very competitive, and the students who will come to JSNN are of the highest caliber. We expect four to arrive in January.”

Some of the students may have an opportunity to stay at the JSNN for their doctoral degrees, Ryan said.

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JSNN to host event on funding for tech start-ups

From  The Business Journal:

“Some young tech companies fund themselves with research grants, while others are able to secure backing from private investors. But an event later this month will explore how one can lead to the other.

“The event, held at the Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering in Greensboro on Oct. 25, will look at how a successful grant strategy can lead companies to investors.”

Admission is free, but advance registration at the conference website is requested.  The program is sponsored by the JSNN, Gateway University Research Park, MBHB Law and Kymanox.

What you missed this summer if you were away

Welcome back, faculty and student researchers who were gone this summer.  To catch up on what you missed, here’s a roundup of the top research news from the summer. Click on the headlines to read more.

NIH, other agencies change conflict of interest rules; comment period open for new A&T policy

  • The Public Health Service has revised its financial conflict of interest reporting requirements for applicants and awardees for proposals and SBIR/STTR Phase II cooperative agreements.

NC-LSAMP annual research conference on minorities in STEM to be held Sept. 20-21

  • The North Carolina Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (NC-LSAMP) will hold its annual research conference September 20-21 at N.C. A&T.  LSAMP seeks to increase the quality and quantity of students successfully completing science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) baccalaureate degree programs, and successfully matriculating into STEM graduate programs.

Students from N.C. A&T and Purdue collaborate on project for space station

  • Primarily undergraduate engineering students at both universities will design and build the shoebox-size experiment, develop the procedures for operation in space, train the astronauts, process the data, and write research papers describing the results.

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