Category Archives: Faculty

The new relationship between editors, freelancers: unexplored territory for A&T journalism researchers

As newspapers depend more on freelance journalists to produce content for print and online publications, a study by two North Carolina A&T researchers examines the pros and cons of the newspaper editor and freelance journalist relationship in the digital age.

The study was conducted by Kim Smith, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the Department of Journalism and Mass Communication, and Emily Harris, M.A.J., a lecturer in the department and advisor to the award-winning A&T Register student newspaper. The researchers found no studies in the literature focusing on the editor/freelance journalist relationship in the digital age.

Such a study is important because of the dramatic changes taking place in the newspaper business. More newspapers are downsizing their full-time news staffs as print readership and ad revenues decrease, while online readership and ad revenue increase. Unable to hire full-time reporters to provide content for print and 24-hour online publications, some newspapers are forced to hire freelance (part-time) journalists, who get paid by story and receive no benefits.

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New RTI University Scholars Program for faculty

The program: Faculty Scholars will participate in scholarly leave from their home institution and reside at RTI for one academic year in partnership with an RTI Host PI. 

  • Up to three Faculty Scholars will be selected in the  areas of human health, energy, and education & workforce development for academic year 2014-15.

Application deadline: January 31.

Key Details: Applications are limited to five pages. … The program is open to faculty members at A&T, Duke, North Carolina State, and UNC-Chapel Hill. … Awards will be announced by February 28.

Full details: Click here.

2 researchers win fellowships for big-data projects

NCDS logoTwo faculty researchers at N.C. A&T have been named 2014 Data Science Faculty Fellows by the National Consortium for Data Science.

The  faculty members and their proposed research projects are:

  • Dr. Rajeev Agrawal, Associate Professor, Department of Computer Systems Technology, Designing Sustainable and Domain-Neutral Next Generation Data Infrastructure to Advance Big Data Science, and
  • Dr. Justin Zhan, Assistant Professor, Department of Computer Science, Community Detection on Big Networks.

Click here for abstracts of the projects. Each researcher will receive $30,000 to support their research. They are among five researchers awarded fellowships for 2014.

Nobel laureate worked on NSF project with A&T

Nobel laureate Dr. Michael Levitt at N.C. A&T

Dr. Michael Levitt in the Fort Interdisciplinary Research Center, 2005.

Dr. Michael Levitt, one of the 2013 Nobel laureates in chemistry announced this week, is no stranger to N.C. A&T. Dr. Levitt worked with A&T researchers on a five-year interdisciplinary project called Biogeometry (full title: Computational Geometry for Structural Biology and Bioinformatics).

The NSF-funded project brought together biologists, chemists, computer scientists, crystallographers,  medical researchers, and robotics experts from Duke; N.C. A&T; Stanford, Dr. Levitt’s institution; and UNC Chapel Hill.  The project’s goal was the development of new computational techniques and paradigms for representing, storing, searching, simulating, analyzing, and visualizing biological structures.

The researchers’ final meeting in 2005 was held at A&T, hosted by Dr. Solomon Bililign of the Department of Physics.

“It is always good to work with such people,” Dr. Bililign said this week. “I learned the power of interdisciplinary research from this team.”

Dr. Levitt is a biologist and one of the three recipients of this year’s prize in chemistry. Along with Dr. Martin Karplus of Harvard University and Dr. Arieh Warshel of the University of Southern California, he was honored “for the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems.”

Higher education and the Treyvon Martin case: Campuses conspicuously quiet on racial issues

From a column by Dr. William Harvey, dean of the A&T School of Education, in Diverse: Issues in Higher Education:

“Would the civic atmosphere be less polarized at this point if our institutions of higher learning had presented themselves as appropriate forums for the national dialogue on race that President Clinton called for 16 years ago? Even now, when we examine the curricular offerings and supplemental co-curricular activities that are presented to our best and brightest young people, penetrating analyses of race, prejudice and discrimination are usually conspicuously absent.

“Trayvon Martin’s killing and George Zimmerman’s acquittal aren’t unusual. Quite the contrary. This tragedy mirrors hundreds, if not thousands, of similar incidents throughout the course of American history. Violence, including homicide, is a tool that White Americans have used since people of African descent first came to this country as a means of keeping us ‘in our place.’ This phenomenon, and the reasons behind it, remains largely unexamined in our colleges and universities.”

Click here for the entire column. It originally appeared on http://otherwords.org/

A&T and 3 Triad partners in solar electricity project

Sun shining over mountain (in Portugal, actually)

A&T, UNCG, WFU, and WSSU researchers are working on low-cost solar concentrators as a key to economically viable electricity generated from sunlight.

Four Triad universities are working together on a project to significantly reduce the cost of generating electricity from sunlight.

The Four Universities Solar Consortium is composed of scientists and engineers from North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Wake Forest University, and Winston-Salem State University. 

The team’s specific goal is to develop a low-cost solar concentrator that will make the production of electricity from sunlight economically viable and widespread.

To do that, the team will have to advance the science of using concentrated sunlight to split water molecules into hydrogen and oxygen and then develop a way to store the hydrogen on site for capacity leveling. “This further requires developing and integrating, through industrial partnerships, three important supporting technologies for mirrors, waste-heat recovery, and high-temperature photovoltaics and catalytic reactors,” the team’s proposal says.

The project was one of three finalists for a $100,000 grant from the four schools’ Triad Interuniversity Planning Project (TIPP). The provosts of the schools are funding the one-year project. Each finalist previously received a one-year TIPP planning grant of $20,000. 

“We were betting in the planning phase that an acre of mirrors could be constructed more cheaply than an acre of efficient photovoltaics, and that the higher temperature of waste heat from concentrator systems will open routes for reclaiming some of it as electricity,” the team said in its proposal.

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Creating And Commercializing Intellectual Property

Dr. Michael Baker

Dr. Michael Baker

Current or future inventors at N.C. A&T who  have questions about the creation, protection and commercialization of intellectual property have an opportunity to get some expert advice this Friday.  Electrical engineer and patent lawyer Dr. Michael Baker will address these questions in a talk at the Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering on Friday at 11 a.m. Dr. Baker’s firm, Salubrix, provides  intellectual property training specifically designed for engineers, scientists and technology managers.

Title: Creating And Commercializing Intellectual Property

Abstract: This presentation focuses on practical aspects of creating and commercializing intellectual property (IP). Primary emphasis is placed on the requirements for obtaining a patent and the essential relationship between patents and markets. Commercializing patents in a university environment will also be covered. The essential relationship between university researchers and senior technology developers in the private sector is also discussed. Lastly, the audience is motivated to tap into their “inner genius” to generate IP.

Dr. Baker earned a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology and received his Juris Doctorate from Lewis & Clark College of Law in Portland, OR. He spent 18 years in industry with Hewlett Packard,  Sharp Labs of America, and IPValue Management Corp.

The quotable Dr. Craig on 40 years as an A&T dean

Dr. Quiester Carig, dean of the N.C. A&T School of Business and Economics

Dr. Quiester Craig, dean of the N.C. A&T School of Business and Economics

From The Business Journal‘s interview with Dean Craig:

One major accomplishment was becoming the first accounting program at a historically black university to receive AACSB international accreditation in 1986. Describe that challenge. The business school overall was accredited in 1979, at the same time as Duke as the fourth and fifth accredited business schools in the state. I always teased Duke that we were fourth and they were fifth since our vote came first in the meeting because they liked us better. Duke’s dean always said ‘come on, Craig, that’s just the alphabet.’ The specialized accounting accreditation was made available in 1983 or 1984 and a lot of schools took a shot. We were initially rejected, and I was advised at the time that if you were rejected the first time you only had a 10 percent chance of making it later. I said that was 5 percent more than I needed. …

Click here for the entire interview with one of A&T’s most quotable deans.

Webinar on NSF CAREER grants Thursday April 18

NSF logoThe Office of Research Services and Project Management will host a webinar, “How to Write a Competitive NSF CAREER Proposal,” for assistant professors in the STEM disciplines.  The webinar will be held in the Fort IRC, Room 410,  from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Thursday April 18. Registration is not required.

The webinar will cover:

  • How to decide when and if to apply for a CAREER grant
  • How to position yourself and your research to be competitive for a CAREER
  • How to structure your proposal
  • How to develop an educational plan
  • Keys to success and common mistakes to avoid
  • A step-by-step discussion of each section of the proposal and what it needs to tell the reviewers
  • How to analyze reviews and decide whether to revise and resubmit
  • Questions and Answers

Additional materials, including example proposal sections, proposal outlines and helpful resources, will be included.

The speaker will be Lucy Deckard, president of Academic Research Funding Strategies, a  research-funding consulting firm.

Click here for information on  the NSF CAREER program.

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Talk on meprin metalloproteases in kidney diesease

Talk on kidney disease by Dr. Moige Ongeri, March 20, 2013