Category Archives: Faculty

Creating And Commercializing Intellectual Property

Dr. Michael Baker

Dr. Michael Baker

Current or future inventors at N.C. A&T who  have questions about the creation, protection and commercialization of intellectual property have an opportunity to get some expert advice this Friday.  Electrical engineer and patent lawyer Dr. Michael Baker will address these questions in a talk at the Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering on Friday at 11 a.m. Dr. Baker’s firm, Salubrix, provides  intellectual property training specifically designed for engineers, scientists and technology managers.

Title: Creating And Commercializing Intellectual Property

Abstract: This presentation focuses on practical aspects of creating and commercializing intellectual property (IP). Primary emphasis is placed on the requirements for obtaining a patent and the essential relationship between patents and markets. Commercializing patents in a university environment will also be covered. The essential relationship between university researchers and senior technology developers in the private sector is also discussed. Lastly, the audience is motivated to tap into their “inner genius” to generate IP.

Dr. Baker earned a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology and received his Juris Doctorate from Lewis & Clark College of Law in Portland, OR. He spent 18 years in industry with Hewlett Packard,  Sharp Labs of America, and IPValue Management Corp.

The quotable Dr. Craig on 40 years as an A&T dean

Dr. Quiester Carig, dean of the N.C. A&T School of Business and Economics

Dr. Quiester Craig, dean of the N.C. A&T School of Business and Economics

From The Business Journal‘s interview with Dean Craig:

One major accomplishment was becoming the first accounting program at a historically black university to receive AACSB international accreditation in 1986. Describe that challenge. The business school overall was accredited in 1979, at the same time as Duke as the fourth and fifth accredited business schools in the state. I always teased Duke that we were fourth and they were fifth since our vote came first in the meeting because they liked us better. Duke’s dean always said ‘come on, Craig, that’s just the alphabet.’ The specialized accounting accreditation was made available in 1983 or 1984 and a lot of schools took a shot. We were initially rejected, and I was advised at the time that if you were rejected the first time you only had a 10 percent chance of making it later. I said that was 5 percent more than I needed. …

Click here for the entire interview with one of A&T’s most quotable deans.

Webinar on NSF CAREER grants Thursday April 18

NSF logoThe Office of Research Services and Project Management will host a webinar, “How to Write a Competitive NSF CAREER Proposal,” for assistant professors in the STEM disciplines.  The webinar will be held in the Fort IRC, Room 410,  from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Thursday April 18. Registration is not required.

The webinar will cover:

  • How to decide when and if to apply for a CAREER grant
  • How to position yourself and your research to be competitive for a CAREER
  • How to structure your proposal
  • How to develop an educational plan
  • Keys to success and common mistakes to avoid
  • A step-by-step discussion of each section of the proposal and what it needs to tell the reviewers
  • How to analyze reviews and decide whether to revise and resubmit
  • Questions and Answers

Additional materials, including example proposal sections, proposal outlines and helpful resources, will be included.

The speaker will be Lucy Deckard, president of Academic Research Funding Strategies, a  research-funding consulting firm.

Click here for information on  the NSF CAREER program.

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Talk on meprin metalloproteases in kidney diesease

Talk on kidney disease by Dr. Moige Ongeri, March 20, 2013

Collaborative, actionable climate change research: How a new global framework is working in Africa

Dr. Fredrick Semazzi of N.C. State University and Dr. Brian Sims of the Department of Psychology

Dr. Fredrick Semazzi of N.C. State University, left, and Dr. Brian Sims of the Department of Psychology talk after Tuesday’s presentation.

Even the best climate data do little good if policy-makers don’t make effective use of them (and you don’t need to look any further than North Carolina for a demonstration). And the best intentions of engaged policy-makers are ineffective if they’re not informed by reliable climate data, which is the situation, for example, in the Horn of Africa.

Climate scientists around the world have some ideas about how to fix those  disconnects.  Dr. Fredrick Semazzi of N.C. State University briefed an interdisciplinary group of N.C. A&T faculty members and students Tuesday on the Global Framework for Climate Services, the main research component of the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP).  Semazzi is an internationally prominent climate researcher and member of the Joint Scientific Committee of the WCRP.

One of the global framework’s strategies is to bring together climate researchers and end users, including leaders of government and the private sector.  The key to success is involving end users at the beginning of the process, in defining research questions, Semazzi said.

“You can’t simply do the research and hope that someone finds a use for it,” he said.  “Research needs to be responsive and synchronized with application.”

Researchers have successfully engaged government leaders in Africa, but huge gaps in observation capability on the continent have limited the effectiveness of their work. Now, with $75 million in international funding secured for demonstration projects, the gaps between capabilities and needs are starting to be addressed.  Dr. Semazzi himself is leading a team in developing a hydroclimate project for the critical Lake Victoria Basin region.

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Graves co-authors book on family violence

Click on image to enlarge.

Academic freedom issue at Appalachian State

The News & Observer (http://www.newsobserver.com/2012/11/28/2512791/asu-faculty-administrators-clash.html) reports today on a controversy involving the Appalachian State administration and a tenured Sociology professor:

Linda Foulsham, director of equity, diversity and compliance, on Dr. Jammie Price: “Her pedagogy appears to be consistently confrontational, belittling, angry, critical, and destructive of the potential for a valuable educational experience for her students. Whether or not students felt demeaned or harassed based on their race, sex, political affiliation, status as an athlete or status as an Appalachian student, there is a consistent pattern of Dr. Price making students feel uncomfortable.”

Dr. Price on the Appalachian State administration: “The whole experience here at App State has been, it’s like going back in time. It’s like it’s 1950 here. … It’s a club. They do whatever they want to do. If a woman says that’s not how it should be or expresses discontent, they put her in her place.”

Dean Coger on engaging women in STEM fields

Dean Robin Coger

Dean Robin Coger

In the November 2 edition of The Chronicle of Higher Education, several scholars and experts are asked why more women aren’t entering STEM disciplines, especially engineering and computer science. Heading up the list: Dr. Robin Coger, dean of the N.C. A&T College of Engineering:

“I have observed that the decision to pursue a STEM major is based on two factors: (1) personal capabilities and preparedness to succeed; and (2) desire to pursue that discipline. I believe that success in attracting more women (or individuals from underrepresented demographic groups) into the STEM fields depends on how well our institutions address both those components.”

For Dean Coger’s full comments, click the link above. To read about N.C. A&T’s success in attracting female students to engineering, see the Fall 2011 edition of Evolution magazine.

The N.C. A&T grant of the month for August 2012: Health Informatics Security and Privacy Program

NSF logoThe Sponsored Funding Report for August:

N.C. A&T received 13 grants totaling $6.59 million in August.

The complete list of grants received in August.

One highlight of the month’s funding was $29,640 from the National Science Foundation toward a $329,000 grant to Dr. Dorothy Yuan of  the Department of Computer Science.  The project is titled, “Targeted Infusion Project Grant: Developing Health Informatics Security and Privacy Program.” Working with Dr. Yuan on the project are Drs. Gerry Dozier of the Department of Computer  Science; Hong Wang, Department of Management; Jinsheng Xu, Department of Computer Science; Justin Zhan, Department of Computer Science; and Kossi Edoh, Department of Mathematics.

The issue: Health informatics is one of the economy’s largest growth areas. With the government’s growing interest in electronic health records and with the growing investment by healthcare organizations in technology, there is an increasing demand for health informatics and health information technology professionals. To make health information systems secure,  the systems’ designers and administrators must be well educated in information assurance, with an understanding of security, privacy, integrity and reliability.

Abstract: The goal of this project is to establish a concentration in Health Informatics Security and Privacy in the Bachelor of Science in Computer Science program. This interdisciplinary project will be a  joint effort of  the departments of Computer Science,  Management, and Mathematics.

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The N.C. A&T grant of the month for July: $239,000 to increase minority engineering grads

US Dept_of_Education_LogoThe Sponsored Funding Report for July:

N.C. A&T received eight grants totaling $512,946 in July.  One highlight of the funding was a grant worth $239,950 from the U.S. Department of Education to Dr. Stephanie Luster-Teasley of the Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering.  Other faculty members involved in the project are Clay Gloster, Leotis Parrish, Matthew McCullough, and Ronnie Bailey.

The complete list of grants received in July.

The project: ENGAGE 2BE Engineers: Engaging the Next Generation of African-American Graduates Entering Biomedical, Biological and Environmental Engineering Careers

The issue: The numbers of under-represented minority engineering students continue to remain low in comparison to the representation in the general population. Despite efforts to increase the diversity of the engineering profession, at the national level African
Americans, Native Americans, and Hispanics collectively represent only 11% of students completing BS level engineering degrees.  The total percentage of undergraduate students pursuing engineering degrees in the United States has increased very modestly over the last 10 years. Compared to other nations such as China and India, the United States falls significantly behind in production of BS level engineers. It is clear that engineering as well as other STEM fields must attract more students to meet the future demand for STEM professionals.

Abstract:  The goal of the ENGAGE 2BE Engineers proposal is to focus on providing mentoring, academic support, stipends and professional development for students at North Carolina A&T State University interested in pursuing careers in Biomedical, Biological and Environmental Engineering. The proposal seeks to develop a program within the College of Engineering focused on:

1) Increasing the number of minority students who complete college and are academically prepared to pursue graduate degrees in biomedical, biological and environmental engineering.

2) Provide support, mentoring and on-campus resources to increase retention and persistence of non-traditional and high-needs students who may have additional challenges — such as students with disabilities, students from low-income families, students from immigrant and migrant worker families, and students with children — enrolled in the departments of Chemical and Bioengineering (CBEN) and Civil, Architectural, Agricultural and Environmental Engineering (CAAE). This support will be in the form of academic mentoring, motivation, and advisement to assist their progression and acclimation at A&T and in the CBEN or CAAE
departments.

3) Implement data management methods to increase real-time advising and mentoring, and

4) Establish a sustainable mentoring program that will continue to serve students in CBEN and CAAE thus increasing the number of  underrepresented students and high-needs/non-traditional A&T students who graduate with STEM undergraduate degrees long-term.